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All subscribers to Pediatric UPDATE audio CDs will also have free access and ability to download the same program in MP3 format. They can also download a PDF file of the complete transcript with Pre- and Post-test Questions and a List of Supplementary Reading Materials.

Volume 36, Issue 9
Publication date: March 1, 2016
Expiration date: March 1, 2019

New Developments in Vaccines Against Herpesviruses: Update for the Clinician
Mark R. Schleiss, MD (Moderator)
Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Adam P. Geballe, MD
Professor, Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, University of Washington; Member, Divisions of Human Biology and Clinical Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington

Michael A. McVoy, PhD
Professor of Pediatric Infectious Diseases; Member, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia

Learning Objectives
After completing this activity, the physician should be better able to:
1. List the eight human herpesviruses and the diseases they cause.
2. Discuss currently licensed vaccines and vaccines in clinical testing for human herpesviruses.
3. Describe similarities and differences for vaccines against varicella-zoster virus that prevent chickenpox and the long-term complications of chickenpox and shingles.
4. Identify both the short-term and long-term morbidity that can be associated with human herpesvirus infections.
5. State the clinical presentation of the major disabilities associated with congenital and perinatal infections caused by herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus.
6. Discuss the potential role of vaccines against the human herpesviruses in the prevention of human cancers caused by these pathogens.


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